Notice: Trying to get property of non-object in /mnt/www/html/www.epals.com/public/classes/CMS.php on line 111 ePals Global Community - project page

Invent It! An ePals Project

Transform your students into inventors that know how to think, explore, sketch, create, try, tweak and sell! First, students use online and print resources to research the creative process used by inventors. Then, they engage in the invention process themselves as they identify a problem and create an invention solution. The project culminates with students creating multimedia presentations that name, explain and sell their new inventions. Multimedia presentations are submitted through ePals to the Smithsonian Invent It! Challenge.

 

This project can be completed as a solo-class or in collaboration with another ePals classroom! Find exciting classroom-to-classroom collaboration ideas in the instructional plan.


Subjects: Science, Math



You must be signed in to submit a "Join Request"

 


You're almost there!

Parents/Teachers...
Before you can contact other members, use your email, or join/start projects, you need an approved profile. If you have submitted one and it has been more than 24 hours, please contact support@epals.com

If you haven't yet created a profile, start one now!

Students...
To contact a teacher or join a project, please have your teacher or parent put in the request for you.

Why do I need a profile?
Approved classroom and family profiles are part of our verification process at ePals. In order to maintain the safety of our site, we require approved profiles before we permit members to contact other community members. A profile also serves as your identity on ePals and allows you to introduce yourself to our community. It also helps other teachers and parents with similar interests and objectives, find you more easily.



You must be signed in to "Save Project".

 

Result

 

Transform your students into inventors that know how to think, explore, sketch, create, try, tweak and sell! First, students use online and print resources to research the creative process used by inventors. Then, they engage in the invention process themselves as they identify a problem and create an invention solution. The project culminates with students creating multimedia presentations that name, explain and sell their new inventions. Multimedia presentations are submitted through ePals to the Smithsonian Invent It! Challenge.

 

This project can be completed as a solo-class or in collaboration with another ePals classroom! Find exciting classroom-to-classroom collaboration ideas in the instructional plan.

Students will:

1. use multiple sources (both print and digital) to research the creative process used by inventors.

2. identify and record patterns in the process of inventing, as noted during reading.

3. compile a list of problems, choose one, write a problem statement, and create a list of at least three solutions to the chosen problem.

4. select one of the three Smithsonian Invent It! Challenges to complete and follow the steps to completion.

5. create a multi-media presentation to explain your invention using the PowerPoint template.

•6. submit the presentation to the Smithsonian Invent It! Challenge by Jan. 4, 2013 (optional).

 

 

Common Core State Standards:

Reading 1, 7, 9, 10

Writing 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

As a culminating activity, students use the PowerPoint template to inform others about their invention! Within the presentation, students must name and explain their invention.

 

Slide prompts include:


*THINK IT: Describe the problem you want to solve.


*EXPLORE IT: Make a list of possible ways to solve this problem. (Sometimes we also add a question like - How have people tried to solve this problem in the past? Think of how you can improve on other solutions.)


*SKETCH IT: Draw pictures and diagrams to show your invention and how it might work.


CREATE IT: Build your prototype. Write down each step so that you will remember exactly how you built your model.


TRY IT: Perform some experiments to find out how well your prototype works. Write down the results of each test.


TWEAK IT: How can you improve your prototype?


*SELL IT: Give your invention a name and explain why people should buy it.


(* indicates the slide is required for submission to the Smithsonian Spark!Lab Invent It Contest.)

Instructional Plan


1. Spark interest in this Invent It! project by allowing students to explore inventions created by other kids using resources such as the ePals get inspired videos (scroll down to “Get Inspired”) or iKids website. Give students time to discuss their favorites and identify how the kid-created inventions directly solved a problem.


2. Post the question “What steps do most inventors take when they create successful inventions?” Then, invite students to research the process of inventing and learn more about the lives of inventors by reading online or print resources. As students read, have them take notes to identify patterns in the invention process. Allow students time to share their lists with peers. Then, share the Spark!Lab Key Steps of the Invention Process and have students compare their own lists with the Spark!Lab list.


3. Talk about the Spark Lab: Invent It! contest and review the three challenges. (To see challenge choices, scroll down to “Pick Your Challenge.”) As a class, brainstorm ideas for each one.


4. Guide each student (or student groups) in selecting a challenge and problem to solve.


5. Now it’s time to invent! Instruct students to use the Spark!Lab Key Steps of the Invention Process to help them in coming up with an invention. It is important that they not only think about the invention, but how it solves the problem they identified.


6. As a culminating activity, students use the PowerPoint template (available in Preparation tab) to inform others about their invention! Within the presentation, students must name and explain their invention and show how they used at least 4 of the 7 steps in their process. (Think It, Explore It, Sketch It, Sell It).


7. Submit your students’ work by uploading a PowerPoint with the challenge selected, the invention idea and the key steps. Or, mail the entries to ePals at Spark!Lab Invent It Contest, 13625-A Dulles Technology Dr., Hendon, VA, USA 20171.



Make it a Collaborative Classroom-to-Classroom ePals Project!

To make this project a multi-classroom collaboration, team up with another ePals classroom. Here are some ideas for making the collaboration within your project workspace exciting:


1. Pair students up across classrooms for an email exchange. Allow them to exchange emails throughout the project that encourage a dialogue about key project steps such as: a) what they learned from their reading about the invention process and inventors, b) their ideas for problems that need to be solved, c) their idea for an invention, d) their list of possible names for their invention, e) their plan for selling their invention.


2. Create a forum for discussing inventors. Have students read biographies about different inventors and share what they are learning on a discussion forum.


3. Create an inventors brainstorming wiki! Within the wiki, students list ideas of problems that need solving or suggest possible inventions to solve problems listed by other students.


4. Invite students to share their multimedia presentations for peer review before submission to the Spark!Lab Invent It Contest.


5. Allow students to create virtual awards to give each other after viewing their peers’ presentations. Kids will have fun brainstorming award categories such as funniest invention, most clever solution, most eye-catching presentation, best invention name, or best sales technique!

one week

Project Leader:

Country:
Subjects: Science, Math

# of Students: 21-30
Age Range: 8-10
Collaboration: Email Exchange, Skype / Video Chat
Languages: English

About my classroom: BF Yancey is a small, rural elementary school of approximately 150 students in grades pre-Kindergarten through Fifth, located in central Virginia, USA. We are interested in communicating with other students from as many countries as possible regarding your school lunch experience. Do students eat in a cafeteria or common space? What foods are eaten for lunch at school where you live? Is the lunchtime meal prepared by the school or do students bring their own food from home? Are the meals sourced from local farmers and providers? What are the components of your favorite school lunch? We are especially interested in collecting photos of school lunches from around the world! Currently, we prefer to correspond by email and Skype, and to write at least 2x per month. We look forward to meeting you and learning about the food culture of your area.